18 Places to Find Blogging Jobs: An Essential Resource for Freelance Bloggers

18 Places to Find Blogging Jobs: An Essential Resource for Freelance Bloggers

Finding blogging jobs can be tough. Where should you look for gigs that pay more than a couple measly bucks for a 500-word post? Are content mills the only way to get paid to write?

The truth is, if you know where to look, you can definitely find better-paying blogging opportunities.

With the rise of content marketing, an increasing number of companies are hiring freelance writers to produce articles for their blogs. Sometimes they offer one-off assignments, which can pay $75 or more per post. Other online publications may look for bloggers who are willing to write several posts a week, the kind of steady gig that can really add to your bottom line.

Writers like Nicole Dieker, who shares her earnings each month here at The Write Life, are using blogging jobs to round out their income and earn a livable wage — and they’re often able to work from home, on their own schedule.

But how can you get paid to blog if you don’t know where to find these gigs? Here are 18 places to look for paid blogging opportunities.

Helpful lists of high-quality, paying websites

When you first start out as a freelance blogger, you might not know which websites pay for posts. Lucky for you, several experienced freelance writers and bloggers have put together lists of websites and blogs that want your work.

No matter your niche, there’s likely a way to get paid for a blog post about it. There’s even a chance to earn $230 for writing about model trains, if that’s your thing!

Here are a few of our favorite lists of blogs that pay for posts:

1. The Ultimate List of Better-Paid Blogging Gigs

Freelance blogger Sophie Lizard put together this list of 75 blogs that pay more than $50 a post. While the list is from 2015 and may not be entirely accurate anymore, it’s a great place to start your search.

2. Freelance Writing Jobs: 25 Sites That Pay for Guest Posts

This list, from Kyle Taylor of The Penny Hoarder, focuses on sites that pay for guest posts. Most pay $50 and up, with several of them focused on writing. (Yes, The Write Life is on the list.)

3. 110 Websites that Pay You to Contribute an Article, Instantly

Bamidele Onibalusi put together this epic list of blogs and websites that pay contributors, last updated in January 2015. You’ll need to sign up with your email to download the PDF of the full list, but you can see 70 outlets in the blog post.

4. Funds for Writers Paying Markets

Writer Hope Clark curates this list of writing opportunities, which generally pay around 10 cents a word and up. Not all of the listed markets are blogs, but many of these publications look for both magazine articles and blog posts, so check their guidelines for more information.

5. Writer’s Markets

Jennifer Mattern of All Indie Writers has put together a huge listing of paying writing opportunities. For blogging jobs, choose “blogging markets” from the drop-down menu.

Writing job boards

What about job boards? While you could spend hours digging through general job boards like Indeed.com, a better bet is to scour boards that focus on writing jobs.

Be sure to read postings thoroughly and do your due diligence before applying — and if the company wants you to write a 1,000-word “sample article” for free, you should probably pass.

6. BloggingPro’s Job Board

The site offers plenty of blogging jobs in addition to copywriting and print opportunities. Most gigs pay on a per-post basis, though not all of them list their rates. Some listings come directly from the client, like businesses looking for contributors to their blogs, while others are from content mills.

7. MediaBistro’s Job Board

This job board has tons of postings for freelance writing-related jobs, from email marketing and copywriting positions to public relations and editing gigs. Tip: Broaden your search to “freelance writer” or “content curator” to help pull up more results.

Many of the positions are based in New York City, but you’ll also see quite a few offers for remote work.

8. ProBlogger’s Job Board

ProBlogger’s job board is popular, and for good reason: You’ll often see multiple new listings each day. I found opportunities in all sorts of niches, from a law office looking for a “legal blogger” to a DIY site in need of a “flower crafts blogger.”

9. Paid to Blog Jobs

Created by freelance blogger Tom Ewer of Leaving Work Behind, Paid to Blog Jobs is a curated database of freelance writing and blogging jobs. Tom and his team look for all the crucial information, like who to pitch and potential rates, and present it clearly and simply so you can evaluate each opportunity.

The downside? The convenience factor isn’t free. A membership will cost you $30 a month, $77 a quarter or $260 a year. For more information, check out our review of Paid to Blog Jobs.

10. Freelance Writers Den Junk-Free Job Board

The Den is a writing community hosted by longtime freelance writer and blogger Carol Tice. Its job board shares carefully curated opportunities.

The Den is only open at certain times of the year, but you can sign up on the waiting list to be notified when you’ll have a chance to join. Membership costs $25 per month, but includes workshops, forums and more. A “Den2X Income Accelerator” program is also available for $139 per month.

Other great places to find blogging jobs

Wading through job boards can be exhausting, and often the gigs don’t pay much. As soon as you’ve built up a writing portfolio, it’s best to move on to other options.

Why not stick with the job boards? For one, you’ll make more money pitching clients on your own, advises freelance writer and blogger Linda Formichelli. You’ll also likely have less competition than you would when applying to a blogging job posted on a free job board.

Curious? Here are a few other places to look for blogging work:

11. Who Pays Writers

Created by writer and editor Manjula Martin, Who Pays Writers collects anonymous reports of rates paid by all sorts of publications, from tiny niche blogs to massive print magazines. No, these aren’t job listings, but you can use them strategically to land a blogging gig.

Search the directory for the word “blog” to see submitted rates for blogs, plus information on the type of contract, lead time and how to pitch. You can also simply scan recent submissions for blogs or websites you’d love to write for to get an idea of their rates before you pitch them.

Once you have your hit list of blogs you want to write for, check out their contributor guidelines and get pitching!

12. Contently’s Freelance Rates Database

While it also includes pay for photography and design, most of the database is devoted to writing jobs. Many are print publications, but you’ll see some blog markets listed along with flat or per-word rates. You can use it the same way you’d use Who Pays Writers: as information and inspiration for your pitch list.

13. Alexis Grant’s Database of Freelance Bloggers

The Write Life founder Alexis Grant is always on the lookout for freelance bloggers for various projects. If you’d like to be included, simply fill out a few questions about your experience and topics you write about, and you’ll be on the list for future opportunities.

14. Jon Morrow’s Big Black Book of Rock-Solid Guest Blogging Targets

This resource lists 103 online magazines and blogs that accept guest posts, including big names like The Huffington Post, Business Insider and Fast Company. The best part: Jon includes contact information for each publication, include the editor’s name and email address, as well as specific tips on how to pitch your idea. Whether you write about personal finance, parenting or photography, you’ll find several great options here.

15. Google

No, not blogging for Google. Searching using the right queries can help you find all sorts of interesting blogging gigs.

Try searching for “[your topic] + write for us” and see what pops up — you might find paying opportunities you hadn’t considered. Play with the wording and search for your niche plus keywords like “contributor guidelines,” “submission guidelines” or “how to contribute” to find paid blogging opportunities that are listed on the company’s website. They’re likely less overwhelmed with pitches and applications than companies that list their needs on job boards.

16. Twitter

Yes, all that time you spend on social media could actually help you land jobs. Beyond letting you showcase your writing for other clients, Twitter helps you find blogging opportunities in a few different ways:

  • Search for blogging jobs: Simply type “blogging job” or “write for us” into the search box. When I did, I found several advertised blogging opportunities, like this one:

  • Check hashtags: Clicking on hashtags like #blogging, #bloggingjobs and #writinggigs can help you find newly posted jobs. Many of these opportunities come from Craigslist, though, so do your due diligence before applying and look for gigs where you work directly with the client, rather than applying to an anonymous “content company.”
  • Follow your favorite bloggers and editors: Congratulations, you probably already do this! Following bloggers in your niche means you’re perfectly positioned to pounce on any opportunity, like when a solopreneur decides to bring on a blog assistant or a popular blog starts paying for guest posts. To keep these important tweets separate from the rest of your Twitter stream, use a Twitter List. Here’s one tweet that popped up in my feed:

  • Follow other freelance writers and bloggers: Everyone wants to share their work, right? When you see another blogging or writer tweet a link to their work on a blog or publication you’d love to write for, check it out. Feel free to favorite or retweet it, and check out the site’s contribution guidelines for more info.

17. Your current client roster

Your clients already know you do an awesome job, right? See whether they need your help with blogging as well.

If you’re handling a client’s social media strategy, ask whether they need support with their blog. After copywriting a fantastic sales page, mention your ability to use those same ghostwriting skills to write a blog post or two in the company’s voice.

Or maybe a client needs help spreading the word about her services — could you help her contribute guest posts to popular blogs in her niche?

You’ve already proven your skills and reliability to your client, so make the most of the relationship.

18. Your own blog

No, blogging isn’t a path to riches. But wouldn’t having clients come to you be easier than chasing them down on job boards?

Showcase your talents on your blog and share examples of your work for past clients. Ensure you have a clear and compelling call-to-action to make it easy for clients to get in touch.Where will you find your next blogging job?

Finding paid blogging jobs isn’t the easiest thing to do on the Internet, but it’s not impossible, either. Hone your writing skills, learn how to write a killer headline, craft a brilliant pitch email and start finding opportunities using the resources on this list.

And on behalf of editors everywhere: Read the submission guidelines. If you don’t, your blogging brilliance might never make it past the editor’s inbox.

Where did you find your most recent blogging job? How do you find new blogging clients? Share your stories in the comments!

This post originally ran in 2015. We’re sharing it again because it’s such a great resource!

Filed Under: Blogging
Blogger Sophie Lizard

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